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Why are 3D artists losing their jobs?

3D artist and designer V.J. Arora has become the latest casualty of the global recession, losing his job after three years as a 3D sculptor.

Mr Arora, who was also a 3d sculptor at a Toronto-based company called Loon Media, said he and other 3d artists were asked to stop working on 3D models in the past two years due to the downturn in the economy.

“I just couldn’t keep going on with my work because of the recession,” he said.

“My company’s doing really well, but there’s just not a lot of work for me.

So I had to go.”

Mr Aroria is no stranger to the business side of 3D printing, having worked on a number of high-profile projects for clients including fashion designer Dolce & Gabbana and carmaker Volvo.

“It’s been really good,” he added.

“There’s definitely a bit of a backlash about it, and a lot [of] people don’t like it.”

Mr Alarora, a native of New Delhi, said his 3d work had not changed much since he started working on his 3D model in 2011.

“All my 3D work has been very faithful to the original, and I really enjoy it,” he told the Indian Express.

“A lot of the things I do with my model, I think is pretty original.”

He added: “I just want to make sure that when people see that I’m still working, they don’t think that I’ve been laid off.

I want people to see that this isn’t happening because I’m working for the big guys.”

Mr Elarora said the slump in demand for 3D printed goods was partly due to an increase in the number of people who are unable to afford to buy expensive new models.

“We have a very young generation,” he explained.

In an interview with Bloomberg, he added that the industry had “taken a big hit” and had been hit hard by the impact of the financial crisis.””

And if you can’t afford to pay that much, you might not want to do that because it’s not worth it.”

In an interview with Bloomberg, he added that the industry had “taken a big hit” and had been hit hard by the impact of the financial crisis.

“If you look at the companies that are losing money, it has been a big issue for us,” he stated.

“But we’re in a bit more stable ground.”

Mr Anand, who is also a sculptor, has worked as a modeler at a number and other large studios, including his own, and said the recession had not affected him much.

“What’s happening is the economic crisis is making us a little bit more careful about what we do,” he continued.

“For me, it hasn’t changed a lot, and if anything it’s just made me more aware of what I need to do in order to get my work done.”

In the past, I would do a lot and then when the recession hit, it was like, ‘Wow, I really want to get that done.’

But now I know that I need a little more time, a little less stress and I can focus on my work.

The downturn in demand has also prompted some companies to cut back on their investment in 3D printers, with Mr Anand explaining: “It’s not just about technology, it really comes down to people. “

3D printing is still very popular in India, and that’s partly due the economy and the financial crash,” said Kunal Saini, CEO of 3dprinting, which has offices in India and China.”3d printing is more than just 3D, it can also create beautiful objects and render models for the real world.”

The downturn in demand has also prompted some companies to cut back on their investment in 3D printers, with Mr Anand explaining: “It’s not just about technology, it really comes down to people.

It’s about the people you surround yourself with.”

Mr Sainis views the downturn as a boon for the 3d printer industry.

“The people who buy the most 3D objects have the highest demand for them and are therefore the biggest winners of the market,” he says.

“Now, the market is getting a lot more robust, and people are getting more comfortable with 3D technology.”

He also hopes the new economy will lead to a resurgence of the 3D print industry in India.

“People are starting to realize 3D is something that can be a career and that it can be something that people can get a good return on, and it’s really exciting for us.”

Topics:arts-and-entertainment,business-economics-and of-consumer-products,industry,business,arts-industry-industries,technology,art-history,education,hindust

| by admin | No comments

Why are 3D artists losing their jobs?

3D artist and designer V.J. Arora has become the latest casualty of the global recession, losing his job after three years as a 3D sculptor.

Mr Arora, who was also a 3d sculptor at a Toronto-based company called Loon Media, said he and other 3d artists were asked to stop working on 3D models in the past two years due to the downturn in the economy.

“I just couldn’t keep going on with my work because of the recession,” he said.

“My company’s doing really well, but there’s just not a lot of work for me.

So I had to go.”

Mr Aroria is no stranger to the business side of 3D printing, having worked on a number of high-profile projects for clients including fashion designer Dolce & Gabbana and carmaker Volvo.

“It’s been really good,” he added.

“There’s definitely a bit of a backlash about it, and a lot [of] people don’t like it.”

Mr Alarora, a native of New Delhi, said his 3d work had not changed much since he started working on his 3D model in 2011.

“All my 3D work has been very faithful to the original, and I really enjoy it,” he told the Indian Express.

“A lot of the things I do with my model, I think is pretty original.”

He added: “I just want to make sure that when people see that I’m still working, they don’t think that I’ve been laid off.

I want people to see that this isn’t happening because I’m working for the big guys.”

Mr Elarora said the slump in demand for 3D printed goods was partly due to an increase in the number of people who are unable to afford to buy expensive new models.

“We have a very young generation,” he explained.

In an interview with Bloomberg, he added that the industry had “taken a big hit” and had been hit hard by the impact of the financial crisis.””

And if you can’t afford to pay that much, you might not want to do that because it’s not worth it.”

In an interview with Bloomberg, he added that the industry had “taken a big hit” and had been hit hard by the impact of the financial crisis.

“If you look at the companies that are losing money, it has been a big issue for us,” he stated.

“But we’re in a bit more stable ground.”

Mr Anand, who is also a sculptor, has worked as a modeler at a number and other large studios, including his own, and said the recession had not affected him much.

“What’s happening is the economic crisis is making us a little bit more careful about what we do,” he continued.

“For me, it hasn’t changed a lot, and if anything it’s just made me more aware of what I need to do in order to get my work done.”

In the past, I would do a lot and then when the recession hit, it was like, ‘Wow, I really want to get that done.’

But now I know that I need a little more time, a little less stress and I can focus on my work.

The downturn in demand has also prompted some companies to cut back on their investment in 3D printers, with Mr Anand explaining: “It’s not just about technology, it really comes down to people. “

3D printing is still very popular in India, and that’s partly due the economy and the financial crash,” said Kunal Saini, CEO of 3dprinting, which has offices in India and China.”3d printing is more than just 3D, it can also create beautiful objects and render models for the real world.”

The downturn in demand has also prompted some companies to cut back on their investment in 3D printers, with Mr Anand explaining: “It’s not just about technology, it really comes down to people.

It’s about the people you surround yourself with.”

Mr Sainis views the downturn as a boon for the 3d printer industry.

“The people who buy the most 3D objects have the highest demand for them and are therefore the biggest winners of the market,” he says.

“Now, the market is getting a lot more robust, and people are getting more comfortable with 3D technology.”

He also hopes the new economy will lead to a resurgence of the 3D print industry in India.

“People are starting to realize 3D is something that can be a career and that it can be something that people can get a good return on, and it’s really exciting for us.”

Topics:arts-and-entertainment,business-economics-and of-consumer-products,industry,business,arts-industry-industries,technology,art-history,education,hindust